Good Bye Import-CliXML – Use the Secrets Management module for your labs and demos

1 minute read

Don’t want to read all this? There are two dotnet interactive notebooks here with the relevant information for you to use.

https://beard.media/dotnetnotebooks

Jaap is awesome

I have to start here. For the longest time, whenever anyone has asked me how I store my credentials for use in my demos and labs I have always referred them to Jaap Brassers t blog post

https://www.jaapbrasser.com/quickly-and-securely-storing-your-credentials-powershell/

Joel is also awesome!

When people wanted a method of storing credentials that didn’t involve files on disk I would suggest Joel Bennett’s t module BetterCredentials which uses the Windows Credential Manager

https://www.powershellgallery.com/packages/BetterCredentials/4.5

Microsoft? Also awesome!

In February, Microsoft released the SecretManagement module for preview.

https://devblogs.microsoft.com/powershell/secrets-management-development-release/

Sydney t gave a presentation at the European PowerShell Conference which you can watch on Youtube.

Good Bye Import-CliXML

So now I say, it is time to stop using Import-Clixml for storing secrets and use the Microsoft.PowerShell.SecretsManagement module instead for storing your secrets.

Notebooks are as good as blog posts

I love notebooks and to show some people who had asked about storing secrets, I have created some. So, because I am efficient lazy I have embedded them here for you to see. You can find them in my Jupyter Notebook repository

https://beard.media/dotnetnotebooks

in the Secrets folder

Installing and using the Secrets Management Module

These notebooks may not display on a mobile device unfortunately

Using the Secret Management Module in your scripts

Here is a simple example of using the module to provide the credential for a docker container and then to dbatools to query the container

These notebooks may not display on a mobile device unfortunately

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